GW 2015: Takayama and Shirakawago

Golden Week has come around again, and this year’s domestic trip saw us travel on the newly opened Hokuriku shinkansen towards Kanazawa. Our friends Wilkes and Becca came to visit for a couple of weeks, and they took full advantage of the JR pass allowing them unlimited travel on the JR trains; Helen and I, however, had no such luxury so had to shell out full whack for the two hour journey to Toyama.

IMG_3325Our planned schedule would see us head from Toyama up to Takayama in the mountains. From Takayama, we were ideally placed to take a coach to the historic (and UNESCO inscribed) traditional Japanese village of Shirakawago, before taking another coach on to Kanazawa at the end of the shinkansen line. The shinkansen to Toyama was relatively uneventful, but the train we took from Toyama passed alongside the beautiful Jinzu and Miyagawa rivers through the mountains.

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Although boasting many shrines and temples (after all, where in Japan doesn’t!), Takayama was quite a small town, obviously most commonly used by tourists as the start point for getting to Shirakawago. We arrived at about 5pm, and had a couple of hours of daylight to enjoy so got to see some of the shrines, and discovered the local specialty of Hida beef. Finding a restaurant that was open on the national holiday was a bit more challenging though!

IMG_3334The following morning, we left bright and early on a coach to Shirakawago. Surrounded on all sides by mountains, and with an average of 10m snowfall every year, Shirakawago was cut off from the rest of Japan for many years, and so retained much of its traditional look and feeling. Now seemingly only used for the tourist trade, the village and its houses are famous for their steeply triangular-shaped roofs, designed so they do not collapse under the weight of the snow in the winter. In late April, it was a gorgeous day more suited for shorts and shades so it was rather difficult to imagine the place under several feet of snowfall, but it was nevertheless a beautiful sight.

Getting off the bus, getting to the village involved traversing a suspension bridge over a fast moving river. Several paths led between the houses, past gardens and ponds and up into the hills. At the far side of the town was a path up the hill to a lookout point (ambitiously called the observatory) which had a view over the whole site. All the open houses were now home to cafes or souvenir shops.

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